Flux Research Group / School of Computing

testbeds people

Eric Eide
Eric Eide
Faculty
Aki Nakao
Aki Nakao
Affiliated Faculty
Jonathon Duerig
Jonathon Duerig
Research staff
Mike Hibler
Mike Hibler
Research staff
David Johnson
David Johnson
Research staff
Aleksander Maricq
Aleksander Maricq
Research staff
Leigh Stoller
Leigh Stoller
Research staff
Kirk Webb
Kirk Webb
Research staff
Gary Wong
Gary Wong
Research staff
Dmitry Duplyakin
Dmitry Duplyakin
Postdoctoral scholar
Aisha Syed
Aisha Syed
PhD student
Joseph Porter
Joseph Porter
Masters student
Boston Terry
Boston Terry
Masters student
Samuel Zachary
Samuel Zachary
Undergraduate student

testbeds projects

PhantomNet PhantomNet

To enable the fundamental research and innovation demanded to advance mobile networking beyond the state-of-the-art, a new facility called PhantomNet is being developed and coupled with the Emulab testbed at the University of Utah. PhantomNet will be a fully programmable end-to-end testbed with unique features to facilitate research efforts at the intersection of mobile networking, cloud computing and software defined networking.   

We are open for business! Go here: PhantomNet Portal.

We are pleased to host the first PhantomNet User's Workshop.

Join us for a PhantomNet based totorial on "4G to 5G and beyond: From theory to practice" at IEEE CCNC 2016.

Emulab Emulab

Emulab is a network testbed, giving researchers a wide range of environments in which to develop, debug, and evaluate their systems. The Emulab facility at the University of Utah has over 600 PCs, a hundred wireless devices, and dozens of switches. It is used by thousands of researchers at hundreds of institutions worldwide. The software that we built to run Emulab is open source, and is used as part of dozens of network testbeds across the globe.

ProtoGENI ProtoGENI

ProtoGENI is an NSF-funded and GPO-funded prototype implementation and deployment of GENI, led by the Flux research group at the University of Utah, and largely based on our Emulab software.

Apt Apt

Now online at aptlab.net!

Apt (the Adaptable Profile-Driven Testbed) is a new type of facility: a meta-testbed that is adaptable through "profiles” to support a wide range of computing-based research domains. Apt focuses on getting the infrastructure out of the way, giving researchers the ability to create testbed environments ("profiles") that are tailored to their own domains, and to share those environments with their colleagues. Apt targets both researchers in computer science and researchers from other compute-intensive fields.

CloudLab CloudLab

Many of the ideas that drive modern cloud computing, such as server virtualization, network slicing, and robust distributed storage, arose from the research community. Despite this success, today’s clouds have become environments that are unsuitable for moving this research agenda forward—they have particular, unmalleable implementations of these ideas “baked in.” CloudLab will not be a cloud; it will be large-scale, distributed scientific infrastructure on top of which many different clouds can be built.

POWDER POWDER

POWDER (the Platform for Open Wireless Data-driven Experimental Research) is a facility for experimenting on the future of wireless networking in a city-scale “living laboratory.” Visit the POWDER portal.

Sharing Artifacts in a Cybersecurity Community Hub Sharing Artifacts in a Cybersecurity Community Hub

This project is creating a new, collaborative, community-driven platform for researchers in cybersecurity. The platform aims to lower the barrier to experiment sharing and reproducibility within the cybersecurity community by aiding researchers in packaging, importing, locating, understanding, and reusing experiment artifacts. The artifacts organized by the platform, including tools, methodologies, documentation, and data, can be deployed to various community testbeds for performing new experiments.

recent testbeds publications (see all)

The Design and Operation of CloudLab
Dmitry Duplyakin, Robert Ricci, Aleksander Maricq, Gary Wong, Jonathon Duerig, Eric Eide, Leigh Stoller, Mike Hibler, David Johnson, Kirk Webb, Aditya Akella, Kuangching Wang, Glenn Ricart, Larry Landweber, Chip Elliott, Michael Zink, Emmanuel Cecchet, Snigdhaswin Kar, and Prabodh Mishra
In ATC 2019 [ pdf :: slides :: bibtex ]
Fail-Slow at Scale: Evidence of Hardware Performance Faults in Large Production Systems
Haryadi S. Gunawi, Riza O. Suminto, Russell Sears, Casey Golliher, Swaminathan Sundararaman, Xing Lin, Tim Emami, Weiguang Sheng, Nematollah Bidokhti, Caitie McCaffrey, Gary Grider, Parks M. Fields, Kevin Harms, Robert Ricci, and Kirk Webb
In FAST 2018 [ pdf :: bibtex ]